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Events (Lectures) - Spring 2014

 

LaFeber/Silbey Lecture in History

Adam Gopnik, "Some Ways of Writing History"

Monday, April 21, 2014, 4:30pm, Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium in Goldwin Smith Hall

Adam Gopnik has been writing for The New Yorker since 1986. During his tenure at the magazine, he has written fiction and humor pieces, book reviews, profiles, and reporting from abroad. His books, ranging from essay collections about Paris and food to children’s novels, include Paris to the Moon (2000), The King in the Window (2005), Through the Children’s Gate: A Home in New York (2006), Angels and Ages: A Short Book About Darwin, Lincoln, and Modern Life (2009), The Table Comes First: Family, France, and the Meaning of Food (2011), and Winter: Five Windows on the Season (2011). Gopnik has won the National Magazine Award for Essays and for Criticism three times, and also the George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. In March of 2013, Gopnik was awarded the medal of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters. Two months later, he received an honoris causa from his alma matter, McGill University. He is an active lecturer, and delivered the Canadian Broadcasting Corporations Massey Lectures in 2011. Gopnik lives in New York.

 

Harold Seymour Lecture in Sports History

Ray Arsenault, "Shadow Man: The Life and Times of Arthur Ashe"

Thursday, April 24, 2014, 6:00pm, 165 Statler Hall

Raymond Arsenault is the John Hope Franklin Professor of Southern History and Program Advisor of the Florida Studies Program at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, where he has taught since 1980. Arsenault was educated at Princeton University (B.A. 1969) and Brandeis University, where he received his Ph.D. in 1981.  He is the author of two prize-winning books–The Wild Ass of the Ozarks: Jeff Davis and the Social Bases of Southern Politics (1984, pbk 1988) and St. Petersburg and the Florida Dream, 1888-1950 (1988, pbk. 1998), and of “The End of the Long Hot Summer: The Air Conditioner and Southern Culture,” Journal of Southern History (1984), which won the Southern Historical Association’s Green-Ramsdell Prize. An edited volume, Crucible of Liberty: 200 Years of the Bill of Rights, was published during the 1991 Bicentennial of the Bill of Rights. His recent publications include Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice (Oxford University Press, 2006), Paradise Lost? (2005) an anthology (co-edited with Jack Davis) on the environmental history of Florida, The Changing South of Gene Patterson: Journalism and Civil Rights, 1960-1968 (2002), co-edited with Roy Peter Clark, and “The Public Storm: Hurricanes and the State in Twentieth-Century America,” in Wendy Gamber, et al. eds., American Public Life and the Historical Imagination (2003).  He is currently working on Landmarks of American Sports, co-edited with Randall Miller, as well as a biography of Arthur Ashe.


Sponsored by George Kirsch and the Department of History
Cornell University
Free and open to the public.