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Barry Strauss Barry Strauss

Bryce and Edith M. Bowmar Professor in Humanistic Studies

Department Chair

Office: 440/344 McGraw Hall
Phone: 607-254-1613 or 607-255-6743
Fax: (607) 255-0469
E-Mail: bss4@cornell.edu
Personal Web Site

Office hours: Tuesday: 2:00-3:00, Wednesday: 3:00-4:00, or by appointment

Research and Teaching Interests

Barry Strauss is a military historian with a focus on ancient Greece and Rome. His Battle of Salamis: The Naval Encounter That Saved Greece—and Western Civilization was named one of the best books of 2004 by the Washington Post. His books have been translated into nine languages. His latest book, Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar and the Genius of Leadership (Simon & Schuster, May 2012), was named one of the best books of 2012 by Bloomberg.

Publishers Weekly writes, "No one presents the military history of the ancient world with greater insight and panache than Strauss."

Strauss is editor of The Princeton History of the Ancient World, a series of books from Princeton University Press. He sits on the editorial boards of MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History, Historically Speaking: The Bulletin of the Historical Society, The International Journal of the Classical Tradition, and Strategika.

Strauss is an avid rower.  In 1999 he published, Rowing Against the Current: On Learning to Scull at Forty (Scribner). He has appeared in more than a dozen television documentaries. He has published op-ed pieces in the Washington Post, L.A. Times, USA Today, and Newsday, been interviewed on NPR and the BBC, and has been quoted on the front page of the Wall Street Journal and in other major newspapers.

He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the German Academic Exchange Service, the Korea Foundation, the American School at Athens, and the American Academy in Rome. He received Cornell’s Clark Distinguished Teaching Award. In recognition of his scholarship, he was named an Honorary Citizen of Salamis, Greece.

He teaches courses on the history of ancient Greece, war and peace in the ancient world, history of battle, introduction to military history, and specialized topics in ancient history.

Courses

Spring 2015:
HIST 6330
Topics in Ancient Greek History

Education

Ph.D. Yale University, 1979
M.A. Yale University, 1976
B.A. Cornell University, 1974

Recent Publications and Awards

Books

Masters of Command: Alexander, Hannibal, Caesar and the Genius of Leadership (Simon & Schuster, 2012). Translations in Romanian and forthcoming in Italian.

The Spartacus War (Simon and Schuster, USA 2009. The Spartacus War, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, UK 2009). Translations in French, Italian, Korean, Norwegian, and Spanish.

The Trojan War, A New History, (Simon and Schuster, USA, 2006. The Trojan War, A New History, Hutchinson/Random House, UK 2007). Translations in German, Italian, Korean, and Spanish; History Book Club, main selection; Book-of-the-Month Club, Military Book Club, alternate selection.

Western Civilization: Beyond Boundaries, co-author. (Cengage, Seventh edition, 2013. First-Fourth editions, entitled Western Civilization: The Continuing Experiment, 1994-2005.)

The Battle of Salamis: The Naval Encounter That Saved Ancient Greece - and Western Civilization (Simon and Schuster, USA, 2004, paperback 2005); Salamis, The Greatest Naval Battle of the Ancient World, 480 BC (Hutchinson/Random House UK, 2004, paperback 2005). Starred review, Kirkus, Booklist. Translations in Greek, Italian, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish.

War and Democracy: A Comparative Study of the Korean War and the Peloponnesian War. Co-edited with David McCann. (M.E. Sharpe, 2001).

Fathers and Sons in Athens: Ideology and Society in the Era of the Peloponnesian War (Princeton University Press and Routledge, 1993)

The Anatomy of Error: The Lessons of Ancient Military Disasters for Modern Strategists, with Josiah Ober (St. Martin’s, 1990)

Hegemonic Rivalry from Thucydides to the Nuclear Age, edited with R. Ned Lebow (Westview, 1991)

Athens After the Peloponnesian War: Class, Faction and Policy 403-386 B.C. (Cornell & Croom Helm, 1987).

Articles and Chapters

“The Classical Greek Polis and Its Government,” in Hans Beck, ed., The Blackwell Companion to Classical Greek Government (Oxford: Blackwell, 2013).

“The Antiwar Museum that Wasn’t: Alésia and the contradictions of the European heart,” City Journal, http://www.city-journal.org/2013/bc0617bs.html, 2013.

“Four Jarring Signs of Turkey’s Growing Islamization,” The Atlantic, http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2013/05/4-jarring-signs-of-turkeys-growing-islamization/276425/, 2013.

“Three Giant Warriors in Ancient Anatolia: Perfect leadership lessons from immortal commanders.” NTV Tarih (August 2012) [in Turkish].

“Trojan War: The Myth of Helen and the Anatolian Reality,” NTV Tarih (July 2011) [in Turkish].

“A New Spartacus,” in Chronicle Review (Chronicle of Higher Education), January 29, 2010, B12-13.

“Slave Wars of Greece and Rome,” in Victor Davis Hanson, ed., Makers of Ancient Strategy, From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome. Princeton University Press, 2010, 185-205.

“Anatolian Crossroads,” The New Criterion (October 2010), 30-34.

“Sparta’s Maritime Moment,” in Andrew S. Erickson, Lyle J. Goldstein, and Carnes Lord, eds., China Goes to Sea: Maritime Transformation in Comparative Historical Perspective. Annapolis, MD: U.S. Naval Institute Press, 2009, 33-62.

“Athens as Hamlet: The Irresolute Empire,” in David Edward Tabachnik and Toivo Koivukoski, eds., Enduring Empire: Ancient Lessons for Global Politics. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2009, 215-226.

“The Spartacus War: An Interview with Barry Strauss,” in Historically Speaking, The Bulletin of the Historical Society Volume X/Number 3 (June 2009): 28-30.

“Military Education: Models from Antiquity,” Academic Questions 21: 52-61.

Response to Adam Hochschild, “Practicing History without a License,” Historically Speaking, The Bulletin of the Historical Society Volume IX/Number 4 (March/April 2008): 18.

“Achilles: Bronze Age Warrior,” MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History 20.1 (Autumn 2007): 18-31.

“Chapter 4: Combat: (b) Naval Battle and Sieges,” in P. Sabin, H. van Wees, and M. Whitby, eds. The Cambridge History of Greek and Roman Warfare. Volume I: Greece, the Hellenistic World, and the Rise of Rome. Cambridge University Press: 2007, 223-247.

“Why Troy is Still Burning,” Historically Speaking, The Bulletin of the Historical Society. Volume VII/Number 6 (September/October, 2006).

“The Black Phalanx: African-Americans and the Classics After the Civil War,” Arion 12.3 (Winter 2005): 39-64.

“The Agony of War Under Oars,” Naval History 19.1 (February 2005): 39-42.

“The Scholar and Teacher,” Humanities, The Magazine of the National Endowment for the Humanities 26.3 (May/June 2005): 8-13.

“The Rebirth of Narrative,” Historically Speaking 6.6 (July/August 2005): 1-5.

“Korea’s Legendary Admiral,” MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History 17.4 (Summer 2005): 52-61.

“In the Shadow of the Fortress,” in Toivo Koivukoski & David Tabachnick, eds. Confronting Tyranny: Ancient Lessons for Global Politics (Rowman and Littlefield, 2004), 233-241.

“On Public Speech in a Democratic Republic at War.” In  Republicanism: History, Theory, and Practice, a special issue of the CRISPP (Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy) 6.1 (Spring 2003): 22-37. Also published as Daniel Weinstock and Christian Nadeau, eds. Republicanism: History, Theory and Practice (Frank Cass, 2004), 22-37.

“The Dead of Arginusae and the Debate About the Athenian Navy” [in modern Greek translation as well as in English] Nautiki Epithewrisi 545.160s (Jan-Feb 2004): 40-67.

“Flames Over Athens,” Arion 12.1 (Spring/Summer 2004): 101-116.

“Go Tell the Spartans,” MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History 17.1 (Autumn 2004): 16-25.

“Faith for the Flight,” Arion 11.3 (Winter 2004): 129-140.

“The Dead of Arginusae and the Debate About the Athenian Navy” [in modern Greek translation as well as in English] Nautiki Epithewrisi 545.160s (Jan-Feb 2004): 40-67.

“Flames Over Athens,” Arion 12.1 (Spring/Summer 2004): 101-116.

“Go Tell the Spartans,” MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History 17.1 (Autumn 2004): 16-25.

“On Public Speech in a Democratic Republic at War.” In Republicanism: History, Theory, and Practice, a special issue of the CRISPP (Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy) 6.1 (Spring 2003): 22-37.

“Alexander: The Military Campaign,” in J. Roisman, ed., Alexander the Great. Leiden: Brill, 2003, pp. 133-158.

“On National Security Strategy and American Policy Toward Iraq.” In M. Evangelista, ed. Iraq and Beyond: The New U.S. National Security Strategy. Occasional Paper No. 27. Ithaca, N.Y.: Peace Studies Program, Cornell University, January 2003, pp. 11-14.

“Reflections on the Citizen-Soldier. “Parameters: US Army War College Quarterly The United States Army’s Senior Professional Journal. Summer 2003 vol. 33.2: pp. 66-77.

Awards

2012: Awarded Honorary Citizenship, City of Salamis, Greece, in recognition of excellence of The Battle of Salamis.

Lucy Shoe Merritt Invitational Residency, American Academy in Rome

Masters of Command on Bloomberg’s list of best books of 2102: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-12-05/gorman-skips-business-jain-likes-faulks-best-books-of-2012.html

2009: The Spartacus War named one of favorite books of 2009 by Books & Culture, http://www.christianitytoday.com/bc/columns/bookoftheweek/favoritebooksof2009.html?start=3.

2004: Battle of Salamis named by Washington Post as one of the best books of the year.

2003: Resident Fellow, MacDowell Colony for the Arts

2001: Faculty Fellow, Society for the Humanities, Cornell.

1998-99: Laurence S. Rockefeller Fellow, University Center for Human Values, Princeton.

1998: Lucius N. Littauer Foundation Research Grant.

1996: Korea Foundation Travel and Research Grant

1995: Senior Fellow of the Humanities Council and Class of 1932 Lecturer in Classics, Princeton.

1991: Clark Distinguished Teaching Award, Cornell.

1990: National Endowment for the Humanities, Fellowship.

1988: National Endowment for the Humanities, Summer Stipend.

1979-80: Killam Post-Doctoral Fellowship, Dalhousie.

1978-79: Heinrich Schliemann Fellowship, American School Athens.

Links

Personal website: http://barrystrauss.com/

Strauss holds a joint appointment in the Department of Classics (http://www.arts.cornell.edu/classics/index.asp).

Strauss directs the program in Freedom and Free Societies (http://freedomandfreesocieties.cornell.edu/).